A Scottish foursome from the Glasgow area, The EXILE formed in February of 1977 with the following line-up: Graham Scott (ex-Free Flight- vocals, guitar), Stan Workman (guitar), Robert Kirk (bass) and Dougie Burns (drums).

The band spent a full 3 hours recording their debut 7" EP (1 hour to rehearse, 1 hour to record and 1 hour to mix). this took place on June 18, 1977, at Glasgow's Thor Studios and cost a grand total of 300 pounds. With the memorably fitting title "Don't Tax Me"", the self-produced record was released as a 4-track EP in August on The Exile's own Boring Records. the EP's 4 slabs of basic no-nonsense punk are: "Jubille 77", "Hooked On You", "Fascist DJ" and "The Windmill", the latter of wich is listed as just "Windmill" on the rear sleeve. Oh yeah, and the sleeve is designed by A.Moron.

Being one of the very first scottish punk bands, The Exile was also responsible for setting up the first Scottish punk club for local bands, Gigi's Disco. The opening of the club (the opening night ended up being cancelled by the authorities) was actually financed by the revenue from the "Don't Tax Me" EP.

"Disaster Movie" , a track recorded in October 1977, found its way onto the "Streets" compilation LP (Beggars Banquet) that came out in November 1977. At the same October recording sessions, "The Real People" and "Tomorrow Today" were also laid down. These songs were, however, not released until January 1978. "Disaster Movie", The Exile's finest moment, is a primitive, but catchy and highly era-fixed glimpse of '77 punk with a contagious singalong chorus to go along wth it.

The Exile's second single, the "The real People" 7", came out on Charly Records in January, 1978. All 3 tracks were recorded in October 1977 and have been released on the various artists compilation CD entitled "Short Sharp Shock" (Overground).

The Exile split towards the end of 1978, at which time robert Kirk (bass) had already been replaced by first Paul amour (ex-Cuban Heels) and then Gavin Patterson. Out of The Exile ashes rose Friction, who never manged as much as a single single.

Biography by Henri B.Poulson

 

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